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Monthly Archives: September 2010

I pulled this from one of the many things I read during one of the many insomnia attacks. The text is from a blogger named hipstomp. Enjoy!0studiogormflow001.jpg

As a raw-loft-liver I’m very interested in “kitchen stations,” or furniture that can be inserted into empty spaces to serve as kitchens where there are no built-ins.

Netherlands-based design firm Studio Gorm’s Flow is a perfect example. It features brilliant touches like a cutting board that slides forward to provide a cavity to dump food waste into the compost bin below; a place to hang your grocery bag when you first come home from shopping so you can unload directly; a dish rack positioned above potted plants and herbs, so the run-off water doesn’t go to waste, but gives the plants life instead.

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Cover your floor with satellite views of agricultural fields

taken from CoolHunting: by Josh Rubin in Design on 20 September 2010

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For anyone who’s ever been mesmerized looking out an airplane window at the patchwork patterns of fields below, the Land Carpet recreates the manmade beauty of the arial views on your floor. Designed by former architect Florian Pucher, the 100% New Zealand wool rugs use satellite images to represent different continents and countries, with fields of varying heights lending a surprising tactile and visual element.

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From Europe’s odd shapes to the grids of the U.S.A. and African shades of tan, the floor coverings are mini-lessons in geography and agriculture in addition to making an attractive and modern decor choice.

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Limited to editions of 88 carpets for each region, prices start at $1,200. Check out the buying info page to purchase.

 

pulled from Buldblog:

VINTAGE MOBILE CINEMA

[Image: The Vintage Mobile Cinema].

This is great: a fully restored mobile cinema that’s been traveling the rural roads of Devon, England, since the beginning of the summer.

“A rare 1967 mobile cinema is being restored in North Devon,” the North Devon Gazette reported last year, “and will visit schools and communities across the county next year, showing historic films unseen for many years, including old footage of the area.”

[Image: One of the originally commissioned vans].

Seven of these vans were originally commissioned by the UK’s Ministry of Technology; this one, a Bedford SB3, “is the only one of the original mobile cinemas to have survived. It was rescued by a previous owner after sitting in a field for 14 years.”

The ensuing restoration was performed by local Devonian Oliver Halls and a group of his friends.

[Images: Mobile cinemas commissioned by the UK Ministry of Technology].

If you’re in England now and hoping to check out a screening, you’ll find a schedulehere, along with brief descriptions of some of the featured films.

It should not be a surprise to learn that the van has also got a Facebook page.

[Images: The Vintage Mobile Cinema].

The interior itself is the cinema, meanwhile; you actually sit inside the van and watch films from the comfort of one of its 22 upholstered seats. The equipment, as listed by the blog Home Cinema Choice, includes:

    Onkyo TX-NR807 receiver
    Pioneer BDP-320 Blu-ray player
    Mordaunt Short Aviano 6 floorstander speakers
    Mordaunt Short Alumni 9 subwoofer speaker
    Mordaunt Short Alumni 5 center speaker
    Mordaunt Short Alumni 3 surround speakers (x4)
    Epson EH-TW3500 LCD projector

The seats themselves date from the 1930s.

[Image: Inside the Vintage Mobile Cinema].

As you can see on the van’s Facebook page, the renovation process was both extensive and very impressive—the vehicle went from a genuine wreck to road-ready. It took more than just a quick coat of paint.

[Images: The van, awaiting renovation].

Here are some shots of other vans from the original commission, as archived by theVintage Mobile Cinema project. These have all since disappeared, presumably sold and scrapped, pushing the whole lineage nearly to extinction. Or perhaps another one will pop up someday, found in an old barn somewhere out in Cornwall.

[Images: Vintage photos of the original cinema van series].

It’s such a cool vehicle, and an amazing project: bringing films to places where public cinema might not normally reach.

Even cooler, if you’re a filmmaker, you can actually see your work screened inside this thing:

    We are looking for independent film-makers work at the moment, to screen aboard the Vintage Mobile Cinema as we tour different events across the country. This is an opportunity for film-makers to have their work screened in a unique environment; a one-of-a-kind 1967 Mobile Cinema, the last survivor from a fleet of seven. The vehicle is completely unique, featuring a retro-futuristic perspex dome above the cab, and it causes heads to turn whereever it goes!

While the call-for-films specifically referred to a festival that occurred at the end of August, it seems you still have a chance; there’s contact info, in case you want to inquire.

[Image: Graphics for the cinema van].

All in all, the renovation looks superb and this particular example of flexible infrastructure—the cinema gone mobile—is an inspiring one. Perhaps this might even qualify as a soft system, in the context of Bracket 2.

 

hyperallergic:  Howard Finster, THE MODEL OF SUPER POWER PLAINT (FOLK ART MADE FROM OLD T.V. PARTS) This is a colorful tribute to modern technology as a tool of God, taking televisions material parts and coming up with something completely different. From the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Center: Howard Finster wanted to celebrate “all the inventions of mankind” in his art (Liza Kirwin, “The Reverend Howard Finster,” American Art, Summer 2002). He created Paradise Garden  next to his home in Pennville, Georgia, an environmental sculpture that shows portraits of such greats as Henry Ford, Leonardo da Vinci, and George Washington amid towering constructions of television parts and bicycle frames. Finster often combined modern technology with messages from God, and in this piece he inscribed lines from his sermons, including “Jesus is coming back” and “Get ready to meet God.”

hyperallergic:

Howard Finster, THE MODEL OF SUPER POWER PLAINT (FOLK ART MADE FROM OLD T.V. PARTS)
This is a colorful tribute to modern technology as a tool of God, taking televisions material parts and coming up with something completely different.From the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Center:

Howard Finster wanted to celebrate “all the inventions of mankind” in his art (Liza Kirwin, “The Reverend Howard Finster,” American Art, Summer 2002). He created Paradise Garden next to his home in Pennville, Georgia, an environmental sculpture that shows portraits of such greats as Henry Ford, Leonardo da Vinci, and George Washington amid towering constructions of television parts and bicycle frames. Finster often combined modern technology with messages from God, and in this piece he inscribed lines from his sermons, including “Jesus is coming back” and “Get ready to meet God.”

 

I thought this was really cool. Not sure if Dupont wants to get into the art or architecture businesses just yet, but maybe 🙂

Originally posted by Lisa Smith on Core77 |  7 Sep 2010vito3.jpgvito4.jpg

Dupont has a history of working with artist’s and designers to find new ways to extend the materials they produce, like Corian. This time they work with artist-cum-architect Vito Acconci, who’s built a large scale installation for the lobby of the Bronx Museum of Arts. The Corian has been manipulated and sculpted to resemble fabric, falling and twisting in thin profiles to create seats, shelves, a table, and more. As visitors pass through the installation, they trigger sensors that activate projections, a subtle show of shadows and light.

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Here’s how Acconci describes it:

“New Yorkers passing along the Grand Concourse will stumble upon this space without knowing it’s been designed by anybody in particular. I want them to become curious, to have a second chance at being children. This public commission is in a sense a strange furniture conceived as an act of rebellion.”

Though the scale and use of material is a bit of a wow factor, the whole thing is a bit difficult to make sense of—the “fabric” metaphor feels a bit stiff, but does make us wonder how else Corian can be “soft.” The project is probably less confusing in real space than in the pictures—go check it out between now and January 2nd at the Bronx Museum of Art. More shots follow.

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Grabbed from BLDGBLOG:

ACOUSTIC FORESTRY

[Image: From Acoustic Botany by David Benqué].

We saw David Benqué’s Fabulous Fabbers project here on BLDGBLOG a few months ago, but his more recent work, Acoustic Botany, deserves similar attention.

Acoustic Botany uses genetically modified plants to produce a “fantastical acoustic garden,” where sounds literally grow on trees. “Desired traits such as volume, timbre and harmony are acquired through selective breeding techniques,” the artist explains.

[Image: From Acoustic Botany by David Benqué].

As Benqué writes:

    The debate around Genetic Engineering is currently centered around vital issues such as food, healthcare and the environment. However, we have been shaping nature for thousands of years, not only to suit our needs, but our most irrational desires. Beautiful flowers, mind altering weeds and crabs shaped like human faces all thrive on these desires, giving them an evolutionary advantage. By presenting a fantastical acoustic garden, a controlled ecosystem of entertainment, I aim to explore our cultural and aesthetic relationship to nature, and to question its future in the age of Synthetic Biology.

There are thus “singing flowers,” “modified agrobacteria” that ingeniously take “sugars and nutrients from the host plant to encourage the growth of parasitic galls and fill them with gas to produce sound,” and “string-nut bugs” that have been “engineered to chew in rhythm” inside hollow gourds.

[Image: From Acoustic Botany by David Benqué].

The symphonic range of sounds is then fine-tuned and modulated inside an acoustic lab using specialized equipment; out in the field, this takes the form of pruning trees into living chords, so that “harmonic note combinations” can bloom on a single branch.

Upscaling this to the level of all-out acoustic forestry would be an extraordinary thing to hear.

[Image: From Acoustic Botany by David Benqué].

I’m reminded of at least two quick things here:

1) Several years ago in the excellent British music magazine The Wire, there was an article about Brian Eno and “generative music,” in which the acoustic nature of backyard gardens was described quite beautifully based on the seasonal popping of seedpods, the rustle of leaf-covered fronds in evening breezes, and even, if I remember correctly, the specific insects that such plants might attract and support. Does anyone reading this have experience with planting a backyard garden based on its future acoustics?

2) Alex Metcalf’s Tree Listening project (which I have also covered elsewhere). “The installation,” Metcalf writes, “allows you to listen to the water moving up inside the tree through the Xylem tubes from the roots to the leaves.” Headphones hang down from the tree’s canopy like botanical iPods, and you put them on to lose yourself in arboreal surroundsound. Imagine a shortwave radio that allows you to tune not into distant stations sparkling with disembodied sounds and buzzing voices from the other side of the world, but into the syrupy tides of trees spiked with microphones in forests andsacred groves on every continent.

More images of Benqué’s project can be seen on the artist’s website.