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Monthly Archives: October 2010

I’m totally doing this before the government stops making pennies for more than they’re worth 🙂
Pulled from The Steampunk Home:
Amanda pointed out this Apartment Therapy post with instruction on how to do it yourself. This particular floor used about $35 worth of pennies — cheap from a materials point of view, if not for labor. Scroll down to a long comment by “teeze” for the how-to.

And Cheetah Velour sent this from the New York Times of a bar covered completely in pennies.
WHO WANTS TO MAKE A PENNY BAR IN PHOENIX??? I’M IN!!!

hyperallergic:  Public Art Versus Public Good Richard Serra, “Tilted Arc” (1981) Over the past week, I’ve been writing about art’s environmental impact and how that factors in to perceived artistic quality. What the debate  boils down to for me is the question of whether art is worth its cost of  production, and how we analyze a piece of art’s efficacy or value. But with different forms of art come different methods of evaluation.  When we talking about public art or outdoor installations, we must  factor in another aspect of the work’s impact: how does the work effect  the public whose space and resources it occupies? Since public art faces  scrutiny on a greater scale than most collector-driven contemporary  art, it has a greater audience to please, and a greater responsibility  towards transparency. READ MORE

hyperallergic:

Public Art Versus Public Good

Richard Serra, “Tilted Arc” (1981)

Over the past week, I’ve been writing about art’s environmental impact and how that factors in to perceived artistic quality. What the debate boils down to for me is the question of whether art is worth its cost of production, and how we analyze a piece of art’s efficacy or value.

But with different forms of art come different methods of evaluation. When we talking about public art or outdoor installations, we must factor in another aspect of the work’s impact: how does the work effect the public whose space and resources it occupies? Since public art faces scrutiny on a greater scale than most collector-driven contemporary art, it has a greater audience to please, and a greater responsibility towards transparency. READ MORE

 

I can’t remember exactly where I saw this one, but it’s cool anyway. I pulled the images and text from another post somewhere a while ago. Enjoy!

According to Ronan and Erwan, “The Ovale collection strives to be original, but it also wants to be rustic and traditional. We set out in pursuit of delicate expression. This composition speaks about every day life, about breakfast, lunch, about everyone getting together for dinner. There is a desire for simplicity”.
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And per Alessi’s founder, Alberto Alessi, “Ronan coined a new expression to describe Alessi, a likeness that appeals to me: ‘Alessi is very similar to the operation described in Tim Burton’s movie adaptation of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, a wonderful factory where Alessi produces cakes and sweets.’ … “

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“Delicate, slightly expressive, simple, almost neo-primitive, deliberately saying “hold the sugar!”, the complete table service, Ovale, marks the entry into the Alessi catalogue of the two brothers from Brittany.”

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I remember seeing the Tokyo Underground construction process on either History (Modern Marvels?) NatGeo or Descovery Channel within the last couple of years. The engineering needed to redirect and absorb capacity created a beautiful structure.

pulled from cabbagerose:

The images below look almost unreal. These are the images of Tokyo’s sewer system. It’s funny to think that this eye popping architecture was never meant to be seen by the external world.

Here is a simple formula:
Advanced Engineering × Japanese Precision = Awesome Beauty
(no aesthetic required)

via: whatwedoissecret

 

Most contemporary art is trying to illustrate abstract ideas with hints of literal elements (like POP art but more refined), or creating some kind of idealism in it’s forms. Mixtures of collage and photoshop techniques along with advances in printing processes have introduced “fine art” to mass production.

Is there an artistic evolution coming?

Many people are working hard trying to impress fickle audiences with what they see as original ideas and shock, but most students of history will tell you IT’S ALL BEEN DONE BEFORE:


Some repeat/refresh has more success that others. Most of what we see in movies and media are nothing more than repeat and rehash of old (obscure?) ideas from our history’s real dreamers:

DaVinci, Telsa, H. G. Wells, Copernicus, Nostradamus, Confucius, etc.

To illustrate what I mean, look up general information on Arthur C. Clark and compare his “body of work” to many of the things created in Science and Movies over the past 40 years…

Here’s a start: Watch Arthur C. Clarke predict the world we live in, in a 1964 interview [Retro Futurism]

http://io9.com/5628895/watch-arthur-c-clarke-predict-the-world-we-live-in-in-a-1964-interview

In other instances, the collector might try to gather what they think those in their “sphere” will enjoy to help reinforce their place within that sphere. “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” is used to justify personal bias or social need masked as a love for all things art. Many “artists” will prey on this behavior using social events and activities to promote their art or ideas. Is this just another form of the natural world’s “gang” mentality showing up in our collective creative process and the consumer masked as an art lover?

Picasso said: “Bad artists copy. Good artists steal.”

Let me know what you think