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Monthly Archives: December 2011

Barbro Åberg, Ceramic Artist, Denmark

Our artist of the week, Barbro Åberg is truly a talented and unique artist. What we love most about her abstract clay sculptures are that each ceramic piece hints at ancient language, astronomy and biology. She creates one-of-a-kind works using creative solutions, strategies and design.

Barbro Åberg’s ceramic work has developed into a very diverse background, with influences from the last decades in the United States, Sweden and Denmark, where she has lived and worked since the mid 1980s, her work reflects a variety of experiments by several generations of studio potters and the professional curiosity that has been the driving force for many ceramic artists, both in Denmark and abroad.

For more on Åberg’s work visit her on the web. 

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Alicia Bock, Photographer, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Tis the season for some art inspired by winter. It is only fitting that Alicia Bock caught our eye with her winter series. Each photograph feels just like winter, so quiet and still.

Artist Statement:

My photography is the search of light and shadows, pretty things in pink, the feeling of the ocean, and a blue moon. I strive to create photographs that evoke memories of our favorite days.

I believe there is beauty everywhere you look. My inspiration is found in memories of my grandparents gardens, and boxes of old Polaroids. I grew up in Michigan and Florida, surrounded by water and color, and am still greatly influenced by those two environments.

For more on Alicia’s photographs visit her on the web, or check out her blog.


The art: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Shafted), 2008.
The news: “Up and Then Down: The Lives of Elevators,” by Nick Paumgarten in The New Yorker.
The source: Installed in the elevator shaft of The Broad Contemporary Art Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Image via Flickr user Rachel Kramer Bussel. Note: This Kruger is famously difficult to capture in a single picture, but I think that Kramer Bussel did a pretty good job.

The art: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Shafted), 2008.

The news: “Up and Then Down: The Lives of Elevators,” by Nick Paumgarten in The New Yorker.

The source: Installed in the elevator shaft of The Broad Contemporary Art Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Image via Flickr userRachel Kramer Bussel. Note: This Kruger is famously difficult to capture in a single picture, but I think that Kramer Bussel did a pretty good job.

(via 3rdofmay)

Kristy Lynn, Painter, Brooklyn, NY

Kristy Lynn’s work explores the realms familiar to dreamers and wanderers. Texture built with wax-infused oil paint and soft color blended from pastel tones flesh out her visions from the subconscious. Delicate lines define her drawings and also form the foundation of her paintings.

In the fall of 2006, Kristy made an adventurous move to Tucson, Arizona. Her time in Arizona was artistically nurturing and she developed a more colorful palette— this carried into her return to New York.

Her favorite place of inspiration is nature, Kristy says that “trees are especially magical and soothing to be around”. She combines different mediums to create her colorful paintings. She tries to evoke a feeling of “calm introspection” from those who view her work. Kristy says she loves everything about being an artist. “It makes me happy on many different levels.” Though, if she couldn’t be an artist, she says her second career choice would be a librarian. Artists that inspire Kristy are Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Eva Hesse, Kiki Smith, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray.

For more on Kristy’s work visit her on the web.

Elizabeth Corkery, Printmaker, Brooklyn, NY

Design is a huge component to our company, so we are always in awe of fellow designers and artists alike. One of them being Elizabeth Corkery, a fantastic printmaker from Sydney, Australia who is currently living and working in Brooklyn. I love Elizabeth’s visual study on the geometry of gemstones. I am not sure what it is about the bold jewel tones that I love, but the rich colors and faceted edges have captivated my attention.

 

What we love about Elizabeth’s other collections of prints are the vibrant repeats juxtaposing organic and geometric designs. These constants form what Elizabeth refers to as the “visual language” of synaethesia, meaning “together”, aisthesis “sensation”, it is the experience of one sense accompanied by the involuntary experience of one or more additional senses.

For more on Elizabeth’s work visit her on the web or read her blog, A Place for Print.